Kriminalfälle
Menschen Wissenschaft Politik Mystery Kriminalfälle Spiritualität Verschwörungen Technologie Ufologie Natur Umfragen Unterhaltung
weitere Rubriken
PhilosophieTräumeOrteEsoterikLiteraturAstronomieHelpdeskGruppenGamingFilmeMusikClashVerbesserungenAllmysteryEnglish
Diskussions-Übersichten
BesuchtTeilgenommenAlleNeueGeschlossenLesenswertSchlüsselwörter
Schiebe oft benutzte Tabs in die Navigationsleiste (zurücksetzen).

Der Fall Jens Söring

29.200 Beiträge ▪ Schlüsselwörter: Mord, Kino, Gefängnis ▪ Abonnieren: Feed E-Mail
Zu diesem Thema gibt es eine von Diskussionsteilnehmern erstellte Zusammenfassung im Themen-Wiki.
Themen-Wiki: Der Fall Jens Söring

Der Fall Jens Söring

23.09.2016 um 09:22
@Rick_Blaine

Da hatte ich wohl was verwechselt. Ich dachte an die Mephis Three, aber der Fall liegt tatsächlich anders, da der Fall vor dem deal noch nicht juristisch abgeschlossen war.

@Venice2009

Volle Zustimmung.


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

23.09.2016 um 17:05
Hier mal der text vom Interview mit dem Anwalt von JS. (Lesen dauert nicht so lang wie ansehen)
Steven Rosenfield on the Coy Barefoot Program | August 28, 2016 | S1E28
The Center for Media and Citizenship at the University of Virginia
The Center for Media and Citizenship at the University of Virginia
545 Aufrufe
Transkript
0:00
yeah
0:03
yeah
0:06
yeah
0:07
welcome to the program my guest is Steven rosenfield steve is a charlatan
0:24
based attorney whose clients include yet during who has been in prison for a
0:30
double-murder for over 30 years
0:33
Steve your client yen's made news recently with a press conference you
0:38
held petitioning the governor for a pardon remind us who you answering is
0:44
and why he's in prison in 1985 he was a freshman at the University of Virginia
0:52
he was both as Jefferson scholar and an echo scholar that's beyond rare that
0:57
combination that he is a German citizen and while attending he met the Elizabeth
1:10
Haysom who was trying to describe was you certainly everybody wanted to know
1:16
her and being her presence she was two years older than yen's and very very
1:21
popular very attractive and he was a nerd
1:25
she took a special interest in him I which flattered him to know when he had
1:30
never had a girlfriend three months after they started dating her parents
1:37
were killed in Bedford County part of the Lynchburg area the bodies were
1:43
discovered at the beginning neither yes nor Elizabeth were suspects and about
1:52
two months after the murders
1:56
during and hasten left the country which made them prime suspects Interpol was
2:02
brought into play and many months later they were arrested in london for caching
2:10
bad checks
2:12
once their inner pool determined that they were wanted in at the United States
2:19
and contact the detectives in Bedford County one detective that was sent over
2:26
to conduct the interrogation answering was a volunteer and provided them with
2:36
information which turned out to be an accurate but was the the nature of the
2:43
interrogation was a somewhat argue in depth so the trial begins ordering and
2:52
Lizbeth asa if memory serves this was the first time that virginia had allowed
2:58
cameras into a courtroom so it was a huge media event and fastest young
3:04
couple of both of whom had confessed right great memory coy and as a result
3:10
of those cameras in the courtroom
3:13
this was a Fed nationally so this was became a national story in many circles
3:22
and followed very carefully because it was videoed live in the video save later
3:31
document documentary producers from Germany would take apart the actual
3:39
testimonies of witnesses as part of their documentary right and i want to
3:44
ask you about the documentary something too but let's go back to the confessions
3:48
she confessed Elizabeth confess for having something to do with inspiring
3:53
and controlling quote-unquote yen's to murder her parents and he confessed to
3:59
actually killing them at first but then before he goes to the courtroom he
4:03
recants and and what does he say
4:05
first I should tell you that in and I
4:08
most remarkable development while under British Authority held in custody
4:17
there's a document that we submitted to the governor that shows yen's was told
4:23
to be held incommunicado unheard of in this country but allowed over there even
4:30
though he was asking for a solicitor and so when he was arrested in london
4:35
that's correct would give an attorney now at and held in the isolation he
4:41
ultimately decided that i will talk with these people to save Elizabeth's life
4:47
because we they were in fact subject to capital punishment both were subject to
4:55
being electrocuted was yelling method of execution we have in Virginia and he was
5:01
in love with her
5:03
it was Romeo and Juliet and he was he would sacrifice himself to try to spare
5:10
her from being executed and so he decided without advice of counsel that
5:16
he would talk to the Virginia detective and who has flown to London to equip
5:22
them exactly and try to persuade him that he was the killer
5:27
what is so remarkable is that this detective this is his first homicide
5:32
cases lead detective never bothered to ask him or confront him
5:38
no yes that's not correct the bodies weren't located there no unions that's
5:44
not what Nancy Haysom was wearing a later this earlier this spring we found
5:54
the most renowned expert on police interrogation and confessions in the
5:58
world he's london-based started out as a Bobby and became the highest level
6:02
detective travels the world teaching writing lecturing about proper police
6:08
interrogation he reviewed the entire during file and concluded that servings
6:13
confession was unreliable
6:16
so just to bring people up to speed during confessed
6:20
to save this young woman that he loved and his motivation was the fact that my
6:25
dad works for the German Foreign Service is a german national i'm not going to
6:30
get tried in America they're gonna have to send me to this is what he's thinking
6:33
is wrong but he's thinking they're going to have to submit a Germany to be tried
6:37
and at the most i might get ten years I'll be out in less than 10 years
6:41
Elizabeth will be innocent because i'm going to take the rap for her she'll be
6:46
out in a few years if at all anytime and we'll be together that that's what he's
6:50
thinking as a kid
6:51
terrific researcher years you've got all that correct in germany in fact as a
6:57
juvenile tried as a juvenile and there it's a your teenage years he was 18 at
7:03
the time of the crime 19 when he was arrested he would have served maximum
7:10
punishment would have been eight years in germany so that was his thinking
7:16
right and his father was a low-level diplomat for the German government day
7:21
was stationed in Detroit you don't think of high-level diplomats being stationed
7:25
in Detroit where I transferred to a mana but yes Elizabeth was found guilty of
7:31
orchestrating the the murders she testifies against yen's correcting and
7:36
again in this nationally publicized trial before there was no Jay that there
7:42
was this case in Virginia just huge news yen's is sent away she sent away for 90
7:48
years he has sent away for two life terms for these murders that he tried to
7:54
bring to recant the confession
7:56
well he did we can't the confession they didn't buy it that's correct
8:00
ultimately found found guilty notwithstanding his explanations for why
8:05
he was trying to spare her life but the defense counsel the lead defense counsel
8:10
would later return to detroit michigan he was not a Virginia lawyer did not
8:15
know how to practice law in Virginia he would later throw himself on the mercy
8:22
of the Michigan State Bar claiming that he was mentally impaired both during the
8:28
preparation and trial of the answering some of his the
8:31
hence work was adequate some of it was substandard so you have petition now
8:38
fast-forward 30 over 30 years later yen's is in prison you have now
8:45
petitioned for his pardon from Governor McAuliffe what's the grounds of the part
8:52
Steve what's what's what's in the document that you said the governor that
8:56
you can point to and you can tell these people who are watching against Missouri
9:01
is innocent he didn't kill this couple back in the eighties how do you know
9:06
that
9:07
what's what's the evidence that you look at today and you say this is why we
9:11
don't think he's guilty
9:13
three matters came together in the spring and mostly this summer one was
9:21
the documentary movie the promise in which the producers spent two years
9:25
interviewing people that I didn't know existed who were very very helpful in a
9:32
given the nature of our petition second was the false confession that our expert
9:39
submitted a report but the third is just overwhelming in two thousand not and in
9:48
1985 there was a serology report identifying blood types of the many
9:54
items that were submitted by one for some of the crimes from the crime scene
9:57
of those only five were identified as being type-o blood the derrick a some
10:06
had taipei Nancy hey some had taipei be Elizabeth hat hey Sam had type-b yen's
10:13
had type o the prosecution use that as you can well imagine ranting and raving
10:18
to the jury that type O blood found at the scene of the crime
10:24
knife fight by the killer the answering has type O blood it was the answering
10:31
who committed those murders and science proves it
10:34
and this is before DNA testing in courtrooms right it's before DNA testing
10:38
and then 2009 governor Kaine established a commission
10:44
and this is post-conviction review of closed cases where there was still there
10:51
were still items that could be DNA test against case was just one of many and of
10:58
the 43 samples that they looked at that were blocked that had blood only five of
11:06
those were type 0 and $PERCENT of those 53 were too degraded to test so they
11:11
tested the two samples that were type-o blood found on the screen door about two
11:17
to three feet from the Darra cases body and this was the typo blood that the
11:23
prosecution had said back in the trial
11:26
this is the blood of yen soaring answering on the crime scene
11:31
this is his blood so in 2009 they test the DNA of that same blood and what did
11:37
they find
11:38
he was eliminated it's not his blood they they do not type blood on DNA
11:43
reports but they do look to the location on the DNA strand to see if it's male or
11:50
female and it turned out that both of these had an XY chromosome so they could
11:55
the report could say that those two samples were a contributor with type O
12:00
blood and it was a male but the end
12:04
sri specifically was excluded so we know two things from that one answering was
12:11
not the contributor of the blood that the prosecutor said was the single
12:16
killer it was only one killer he kept telling the jury and it was yen's with
12:22
type O blood so we know he's eliminated but it also means that somebody else is
12:28
the killer with a DNA profile that is unique
12:35
it's not yet as DNA in that blood was found at the scene in the in the type of
12:41
blood
12:42
we are not his DNA absolutely and we we are hoping that the governor who have
12:47
personal of confidence from having done the Robert Davis case with him that he
12:56
he really cares about justice issues and I know that he will ask his staff of
13:05
investigators to look at that DNA profile and let's check to see if it's
13:12
in a data bank it would be the obvious thing to do right don't get that DNA and
13:16
run it through the data bank and see what if it doesn't match entering maybe
13:20
it matches so somebody in the database well why didn't be detectives the lead
13:24
detective who flew to Great Britain he had the reported 2009 know the reason
13:31
that we didn't put make this connection is that you answering is a prisoner can
13:35
only have but so many pieces of paper in his cell he sent to Germany tens of
13:41
thousands of pages of documents to be stored over there so when he got the DNA
13:47
test revealing that he was eliminated
13:51
what he didn't know was that the serology report from 1985 had type of
13:58
blood tested at when the DNA was tested so it took till the summer that we got
14:05
the 1985 read report but the detective in bedford county had the 1985 serology
14:13
report and when he saw stirring was eliminated he you would think he would
14:18
have looked at the 11 items of evidence that were tested to determine if any of
14:23
them were type-o blood
14:24
I don't know the answer i don't know if he did and he's remained silent
14:28
I don't know if he did and he privately investigated to see who contributed that
14:34
type of what or if he's completely ignored or as lost and doesn't know what
14:41
he's doing
14:42
I don't know the answers to let's take a quick break in
14:45
let's talk about this more right when we get back a very quick break and stay
14:49
with us we'll be right back
15:13
yeah
15:40
welcome back were talking with Steve rosenfield these client you answering
15:55
has recently petitioned governor McAuliffe for a pardon for a
15:59
double-murder he was convicted of committing back in the nineteen eighties
16:02
I want to just really stressed this point here Steve
16:09
he was convicted before we had the use of DNA evidence in courtrooms now that
16:13
we do we find his DNA is not at the scene is DNA is not in the blood that
16:17
prosecutor said was his blood and that he alone was responsible but there's
16:22
there's other stuff besides the DNA mean there's the witness who rented the car
16:27
who says yeah Elizabeth hasten came back with a rent-a-car and there was blood in
16:31
the car and and she was with a guy who wasn't answering who had wounds and cuts
16:36
on him
16:37
uh there's the fact that James was convicted his sock footprint matched a
16:43
sock found in the on the crime scene like a sock print is like a fingerprint
16:49
that's ludicrous to think of that people would take that seriously back in the
16:53
mid eighties but they did
16:56
it's like having a glove on your hand it's it's just amazing
16:59
well let me just quickly correct you because it it's a critical piece of
17:04
evidence the car was rented on a Friday taken to washington DC they stayed
17:14
Friday night Saturday and Elizabeth let the ends and Elizabeth it was rent to to
17:19
Elizabeth they returned the car on sunday the murders occurred Saturday
17:23
night when our theory is Elizabeth went back home and
17:30
helped in them in the murders she testified that on Saturday night in
17:38
georgetown she was standing outside of a movie theater and yen strove by in the
17:46
rental car he was covered from head to toe in a white sheet the next morning
17:54
the car was returned to the rental agency and the agent testified at the
17:59
trial that the car was spotless
18:03
furthermore the detective testified that they used luminol which is a a spray
18:09
chemical that will detect the most my new elements of blood virtually
18:16
impossible to erase the blood and here was a car with upholstery with the
18:23
crevices in the gas pedal and the right not a lot in the rental car no blood in
18:28
the rental car
18:30
ok but that was her testimony there is note there is no physical evidence tying
18:35
the ends to the crime scene and the software and you're exactly right to
18:40
laugh the the non-expert that was called by the prosecution and I call him that
18:46
because the judge refused to recognize him as an expert in sauk impression he
18:52
was a tire expert but the judge said he could nevertheless testify about the
18:57
sock and the joke really is how it was admissible in 1985 and since then the
19:06
american association of forensic scientists for instance hundred and
19:11
thirty two of them declared long before 1985 that sock print impressions is not
19:20
science its junk science it's junk yes that's being nice because you're using
19:24
the word science in there and think you're not going to do it science
19:26
professor Brandon Garrett known to this community because he's a professor at
19:30
the University of Virginia works on innocents cases teamed up with Peter
19:34
Neufeld from the need your innocence project and they wrote a law review
19:38
article tracking the history of various kinds
19:43
of evidence which is junk science and they included sock print it
19:49
so if you throw out the soft print evidence says is any rational person
19:55
should do
19:56
yeah you throw out the blood and you throw out Elizabeth hey soms testimony
20:02
because she just couldn't be accurate in so many different ways and then you have
20:09
to look at yeses own confession put aside that he has an expert that says it
20:14
was his confession was unreliable that he couldn't get the facts straight of a
20:18
murder that he supposedly says he did and he didn't even he couldn't even
20:22
describe the crime scene
20:23
exactly I'm not a lawyer you're the lawyer but i'll tell you what when I
20:27
look at this stuff and I read this stuff I look at a case a horrific double
20:32
murder an awful tragedy you have this kid who says he did it and the police
20:38
take that and start working backwards and so it's all just confirmation bias
20:42
if they run into in which the confirmation bias is what gave us a
20:46
rolling stone article about a rape that never happened
20:48
they start working backwards and looking at things like well there's the socket
20:52
it if there's anything that even remotely looks like it might be evidence
20:57
they take it as a rationale for conviction because they're working
21:02
backwards from a confession that they believe and that a kid wanted them to
21:08
believe that bias is powerful
21:11
it prevents a good interrogators our interviewers as they call them in great
21:17
britain from asking the right questions and not be satisfied that because
21:21
somebody confessed that it is truthful
21:25
so for instance yen's was not asked very many before during or after questions or
21:31
for how long did you plan to commit the murders did you anticipate what weapon
21:38
you would use how did you determine that it would be a knife that you have any
21:42
experience with a knife
21:44
you're just a he was about a hundred and twenty pounds
21:47
Derek a sim was about 63 260 pounds Minister Mr xoring do
21:54
you contemplate oh how you would pull off killing these two people
22:01
why would you do it now as it turns out the the detectives lead detective his
22:09
has been interviewed and has said that he was furious with the case of parents
22:16
he hated them there was no evidence at trial the prosecution told the jury the
22:21
motive was because they would wouldn't let him continue to see Elizabeth there
22:26
is absolutely no evidence is not a single witness was put on the witness in
22:32
including always a bit hasten to say that yes had any animosity and in fact
22:37
yes had met him one time for 30 minutes and it was an FBI profiler at the time
22:42
who said based on the research it looks like a woman who had access and new this
22:48
couple was guilty of the murders very good that that's exactly right and
22:52
indeed the president lead investigator who was on the case back then he says
22:58
there never was an FBI profiler and Edsall's back is on video
23:05
he died but before that he was given a video interview which he said I'm sure I
23:11
remember the hay some case I i went to the scene
23:14
I inspected the scene i interviewed Susie and add songs back as an FBI
23:20
profiler and that lead detective said now he wasn't there
23:25
no I wouldn't know anything about a profile we would have it we would have
23:28
to have turned it over to the defense that they're denying they ever
23:32
yeah this lead detective is denied you think ends is innocent yes what is what
23:37
should the governor do it is not likely to do anything before the presidential
23:40
election i guess there i guess that's the elephant in the room you know I
23:43
don't think that this governor is swayed by the politics i learned in robert
23:48
davis is case that justice was really is really paramount if a mistake was made
23:53
what is the downside to him if a mistake was made especially with the DNA
23:58
exoneration how does he look bad
24:01
why would politics even enter into it before after quite frankly
24:06
investigations go through the parole board and they have many many people
24:11
ahead of the answering case who also proclaimed to be innocent
24:17
so it has to be patient he has to be patient
24:20
this is a 20-17 likely outcome but the fact that you submitted the petition for
24:26
him with all this new evidence and calling into question the evidence that
24:30
convicted him over 30 years ago but if 1990 that means that he is officially on
24:36
a list to be reviewed and and indeed when the evidence is as compelling as
24:43
this it makes for an easier investigation when you have scientific
24:46
evidence totally refuting the government's theory of the case is it it
24:53
can catapult you to the top of the list and maybe get you relief for what is the
24:59
likelihood before its investigated that law enforcement or anybody will run that
25:04
DNA from the crime scene through the data bank
25:08
well 0 law enforcement should embrace change changes in information and you
25:15
would like to think that law enforcement everywhere would say listen if a mistake
25:21
was made and we have the wrong guy
25:23
it means that there's somebody out there not what they do Steve you know that's
25:26
not what they do
25:27
you're exactly live in a world of absolutes and the in yes guilty he was
25:32
found guilty he's in prison move on ego false pride it all gets in the way of
25:36
sound judgment and it's a it's very disappointing because there are
25:41
estimated to be a thousand or more people in our Virginia system that are
25:47
innocent completely and it's just in the Virginia system because of the clumsy
25:51
way the system works
25:53
yes people who don't have died can't afford right he said lawyers resources
25:59
aren't made available to let me ask you this do it were we only get a couple
26:02
minutes left for sure what it what is your response to those who watch that
26:06
case years ago and they were glued to the story and they've been following the
26:11
story ever since
26:12
what's your response to them
26:14
to those who believe in saugus absolutely guilty i saw that trial I
26:19
known this story from the very beginning
26:21
he's a cold-blooded killer well their world world must be turned upside down
26:26
when they realized that his blood is not at the scene and then you can work
26:32
backwards from there and say well maybe his confession also was not accurate and
26:38
and understand that the world's most renowned expert in this area says indeed
26:44
it was unreliable and then when the movie comes to North America it will be
26:49
here this coming fall the promise it's an exquisite movie because it is so
26:56
detailed and in outlining the case and they did not have the benefit of the DNA
27:02
analysis so you add that on top of this so you add that on top of it
27:07
promise me you'll come back when there's any kind of development in this and
27:10
we'll talk more glad to do it
27:11
ok thank you see I appreciate your welcome Steve rosenfield charlottesville
27:15
attorney its client answering his petition governor McAuliffe for review
27:19
and a pardon of his conviction
27:22
I'm going barefoot you can find a complete archive of the program online
27:25
at media and citizenship . org have a terrific week and you'll be good to each
27:30
other
Veröffentlicht am 30.08.2016



melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

24.09.2016 um 18:54
Hi :) an alle fleißigen Schreiberleins hier, erstmal muss ich sagen, ich hab mir das Buch "wo alles Mitleid endet" vor ca. 14 Tagen gekauft und innerhalb eines Tages gelesen, dann habe ich sämtliche Beiträge auf YouTube angesehen und bin letztendlich hier gelandet und hab mir die letzten 14 Tage jeden Beitrag von euch durchgelesen.
Danke für die vielen Links usw, wirklich klasse.
Meiner Meinung nach und die stand schon beim lesen des Buchs irgendwann fest, ist das beide am Verbrechen teilgenommen haben und Jens auf keinen Fall unschuldig ist!!
Habe heute sein Buch "Nicht schuldig" anfangen, musste schon auf der ersten Seite zum schmunzeln anfangen;)
Auf jedenfall an alle hier ein dickes Danke und ich hoffe der Thread geht noch spannend weiter ;)


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

25.09.2016 um 21:47
Jens Soering beschreibt sich als immerwährend intelligent. Nicht berechnen konnte er wohl sein Gefühl, weil ein JS wohl gerne ohne diese Instanz auskommt. Bemerkenswert scheint mir, dass dieses Verbrechen seinerzeit wohl minutiös geplant gewesen ist. Die Überschätzung der eigenen Person sagte ihm wohl, er käme - nach seiner Überzeugung - straflos ans Ziel Elizabeth Haysom für immer abhängig von ihm zu haben. Hinzu kommt wohl auch noch ein Quäntchen Wohlstandsgedanke ohne eigene Arbeitsleistung. Wäre Wohlstand kein Thema gewesen für JS, dann hätte er wohl auf Londoner Scheckbetrug verzichtet und stattdessen ordentlich gearbeitet. Volljährig war er und niederbezahlte Jobs gab es wie Sand am Meer seinerzeit in London. Ich war selbst 1984 von meinem Internat nach London abgehauen und fand gleich ein Tag danach eine Stelle über ein "Job centre" mit Unterkunft und Verpflegung in einem B&B Hotel für 2 Pfund Sterling die Stunde.

Jens Soering rechnete, meiner Überzeugung nach, aber nicht mit der ihm danach
begleitenden Angst, die ihn irrational werden ließ, andernfalls, wäre er doch in den USA geblieben, seine Fingerabdrücke abgegeben haben und auch eine Blutprobe.

The Principle of Uncertainty (Heisenberg)hat ihn übermannt. Wenn er an seinen Plan geglaubt hätte, dann wäre er geblieben. Ggf. wäre Elizabeth Haysom allein erst einmal ausgereist. Die Angst hat ihn aber Fehler machen lassen. Es gibt einfach kein perfektes Verbrechen. Angeblich (Gardener/EH) wollte er ja Gardener killen, um einen unbequemen Menschen auszuschalten. Ich meine, es recht zu erinnern, dass er mir damals in Ashford (1986) erzählt hatte, dass dieser Plan EH nicht gefiel. Sie wollte keinen unschuldigen Menschen "opfern". Ich habe auch nirgendwo gelesen, das EH jemals erwogen hatte sich einen Zellengenossen (im Gefängnismenschenhandel) zu erkaufen, wie es JS "uns" in einem seiner "Newsletter" berichtete.

"Angst" etwas irrationales, von keinem Menschen steuerbar. Es dominiert einen Menschen. Nichts reicht aus, um einen Menschen ein einmaliges Angsterlebnis zu entfernen. Angst existiert, wie alle Gefühle, allein im Unterbewußtsein eines Menschens und reagiert allein auf Stimulation. Das hatte der Erstsemester- Geschichtsstudent JS nicht mitberücksichtigt, meine ich, bei seinem "Masterplan".


1x zitiert1x verlinktmelden

Der Fall Jens Söring

25.09.2016 um 22:44
@Ashford1986

Interessanter Gedankengang. JS hat tatsächlich einige dumme Fehler gemacht. Vor der Tat und danach. Warum schafft es ein eingebildeter Intellektueller nicht ein vernünftiges Alibi zu kreieren? Daher bin ich auch hin und her gerissen, ob die Tat wirklich geplant war, siehe Briefverkehr, oder eben spontan.

Nach der Tat hat ihn wohl tatsächlich die Angst übermannt. Die überstürzte Flucht, diese ganzen Straftaten. Alles schwer erklärlich.

Der Plan seine Oma zu töten um so an Geld zu kommen, war wohl nur ein wirrer Gedankengang, aber eben auch von der Angst getrieben.


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

25.09.2016 um 23:27
@elvis

"Oma töten", geht's denn noch?
Für wohl alle, außer Psychopathen, unvorstellbar. Diese Tatsache, wenn sie doch seinem Genre ausmacht, ist allessagend! Und m.E. unverzeihlich, allein der Gedanke. Keine Strafe reicht aus, um einen Menschen, der jemals so gedacht hat, unschädlich zu machen, so dass dieser überhaupt riskiert werden könnte nochmals frei zu sein. Unverständlich, dieses Gehirn eines Psychopathen!


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

26.09.2016 um 10:30
ich muss sagen, dass ich zwischenzeitlich etwas ins schwanken gekommen bin und gedachte habe, dass egal ob er es nun war, 30 Jahre Haft eine sehr lange Zeit sind. Aber das was er jetzt versucht abzuziehen, durch die DNA seines von ihm getöteten Opfers aus dem Gefängnis zu kommen, setzt dem die Krone auf. Auch wenn es heute wahrscheinlich nicht mehr hoch im Kurs steht, empfinde ich das als makaber und hoffe, dass er nicht frei kommen wird.

Wenn man bedenkt, was ihm die USA überhaupt in seiner Gefangenschaft alles ermöglichte. Er kann Bücher schreiben, Interviews geben, Filme über ihn drehen lassen usw. Ich glaube, dass viele andere Länder dem schon längst einen Riegel vorgeschoben hätten. Er veräppelt die ganze Zeit andere, beschäftigt mit Nichts viele Menschen. Wie z. B. nun wieder mit der DNA-Analyse. Das kostet alles Zeit und Geld. Spätestens nach der Geschichte sollte man dem einen Riegel vorschieben.


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

26.09.2016 um 12:00
@Venice2009

Und genau das wird mal wieder nicht passieren. Mit was für einer Begründung könnte der Bundesstaat Virginia JS Fernsehinterviews, Briefe etc. verbieten? Die alten Newsletter an seine Anhänger/innen in welchen er mit seinen Straftaten im Knast prahlt (Bestechung etc.) wurden ja bereits gelöscht, d.h. die Beweise wurden quasi (vorsätzlich) vernichtet!

Und JS hat ja auch das Recht auf Meinungs- und Redefreiheit in den USA welches gemäß ersten Zusatzartikels zur US-Verfassung traditionell sehr weit geht, weiter als in Deutschland sogar (z.B. ist Volksverhetzung keine Straftat in den USA, da dies zur freien Meinungsäußerung gehört).

Außerdem stachelt er ja niemanden zu Straftaten an; andererseits bin ich überrascht, dass er seine Briefe/Newsletter immer auf Deutsch schreiben durfte und nicht auf Englisch musste, denn ich glaube nicht, dass die dort im Gefängnis in Buckingham einen Übersetzer bereit halten nur für ihn. ;-)

Was interessant wäre zu wissen ist, in wie weit JS Ärger wegen Verleumdung der Opfer bekommen könnte und das wäre dann wohl eher ein Problem für das Zivilrecht und bei JS dürfte nicht allzu viel zu holen sein, da er ja alles von seinen Unterstützer/innen für Anwälte/Klagen, pseudowissenschaftlichen Gutachten etc. ausgibt und das alles ist in den USA in der Regel teurer als in Deutschland sogar. ;-)

Ich bin vor allem gespannt ob das Parole Board und der Gouverneur bereits im Oktober ihre Entscheidung verkünden werden und nicht wie letztes Jahr im November (Parole Board) und Dezember (Gouverneur), da sich ja an der Gesamtbeweislage ja praktisch nichts geändert hat wenn ich das richtig sehe.


1x zitiertmelden

Der Fall Jens Söring

26.09.2016 um 13:01
Hesse18
Zitat von Hesse18Hesse18 schrieb:andererseits bin ich überrascht, dass er seine Briefe/Newsletter immer auf Deutsch schreiben durfte und nicht auf Englisch musste
Ist das so? Meines Wissens schreibt er nur auf Englisch seine Texte, die dann außerhalb der Mauern übersetzt werden.


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

26.09.2016 um 13:43
Zur Sache mit den DNA von vermutlich DH (Blutgruppe A) in den beiden Proben mit JS Blutgruppe 0:

JS und seinen Anwalt müssten klar sein, dass es so ist. Demzufolge bleibt nur noch Taktik über.
Die Story ist natürlich geeignet für die Doku ("Das Versprechen") Werbung zu machen.
Ich glaube aber nicht so recht, dass das der einzige Grund ist. Der Film bedingt wohl eher das Timing.

Wenn man von der Gegenseite auf die Aussage: "Das Blut (genauer die DNA im Blut) vom mutmaßlichen Täter (BG 0) ist nicht von JS" reagieren will, dann muss man unvermeidlich öffentlich verkünden, dass das wohl die DNA von DH ist, oder zumindest die DNA die auch in den Blutspuren mit BG A, vorkommt ist. Man müsste also erklären, wie diese DNA dort hin kommt. Wie man dies hingekommen will ohne eines oder gar beide Gutachten zu den Blutproben oder die Probennahmen zu diskreditieren, kann ich im Moment nicht erkennen. Man hält sich also folglich zurück.

Ich frage mich auch, ob so ein Statement der Gegenseite nicht als neuer Beweis im Sinne der 21 Tage Regel des Staates Virigina gewertet werden kann. Das wäre dann etwas was man auf JS Seite vielleicht gebrauchen kann.

Das Ganze macht für mich schon ein wenig den Eindruck, des im amerikanischen Rechtssystem wohl üblichen "Ping-Pong-Spieles" zwischen Anklage und Verteidigung.


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

26.09.2016 um 13:52
@LangSchlaefer
die Proben wurden 1985 genommen, damals gab es die DNA-Analyse überhaupt nicht. Ist es tatsächlich so verwunderlich, dass da Blutspuren vermischt wurden? Kann ich mir gar nicht wirklich vorstellen. Das einzige "verwerfliche" ist, dass es niemandem aufgefallen ist. Aber dazu hatte ich auch bereits eine Erklärung geliefert. Da es sich um die selbe DNA handelte, ging niemand von einer weiteren Person aus.

Meiner Meinung nach war das JS schon längs bekantnt gewesen. Er nutzte nur diesen Zeitpunkt um Druck auf den Gouverneur auszuüben. Da kommt dann auch noch das selbst gezahlte Gutachten über sein angebliches falsches Geständnis. Welches letztendlich aber nicht besagt, dass es sich tatsächlich um eins handelt. Der Gutachter kreidet genau die gleichen Dinge an, die auch JS immer wieder erwähnt.

Er wird auch schlecht erklären können, wie er gewusst haben kann, dass der Täter das Haus erneut auf Socken betrat. Das kann nur jemand gewusst haben, der mit am Tatort gewesen ist.


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

26.09.2016 um 13:58
@Hesse18
@Paulsen

Briefe auf Deutsch versenden ist kein Problem, er darf ja auch welche auf Deutsch bekommen. Ich habe auch schon ein Bild von einem seiner Briefe gesehen.
Sein Buch hat er aber tatsächlich auf Englisch geschrieben, dass war aber sein eigener Wunsch.

@LangSchlaefer

Ich weiß nicht, ob ich doch richtig verstanden habe, aber die Staatsanwaltschaft oder das Gericht haben gar nichts zu erklären oder zu beweisen. JS muss zweifelsfrei nachweisen, dass er unschuldig ist. Das kann er aber nach wie vor nicht.


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

26.09.2016 um 20:01
@hesse
@Paulsen
@ElvisP

Jens Soering darf keine Zeitungen und Zeitschriften, oder deutsche Bücher in seiner Haftanstalt beziehen. Briefe darf JS aber in deutscher Sprache schreiben, absenden und auch erhalten.

Es ist zudem zu bemerken, das JS uns oftmals "seine" (Knast-) Welt nicht real beschreibt. Die Newsletter waren da ein gutes Beispiel für, aber auch, was JS uns bei dieser Gelegenheit alles offenbarte. Wir dürfen bei dem Erstsemesterstudenten JS (freshman) nicht verkennen, dass dieses ganze Geschreibsel aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach dem kranken Gehirn eines (zum Glück) inhaftierten Psychopathen entspringt.
In der Haft verlieren viele Menschen bereits in den ersten drei Monaten die Realität. Jemandem, der über 20 Jahre inhaftiert ist, dem hört meiner Meinung nach keiner mehr zu; denn die schöngefärbten Geschichten sind zumeist zusammengereimt, oder sie wiederholen sich unendlich, wie bei dementen Menschen.
In der ehemaligen Sowjetunion beschrieb uns der Schriftsteller Solschenezyn den Archipel Gulag und das damit verbundene Stalinsche Viertel (25 Jahre Haft/Arbeitslager). Dieses Viertel wurde zwecks Planerfüllung bereits für Bagatelldelikte verhängt.
In einem FT-Interview erklärte Solschenezyn, der Staatsplan ging nicht auf; denn nach 25 Jahren sei, der Mortalität geschuldet, niemand mehr entlassen worden. Es wäre aber auch zu grausam gewesen. Der Gesellschaftshass des Delinquenten ("seki") wohl auch zu groß, um diesen nochmals der Gesellschaft zumuten zu können.
Nach über 30 Jahren Haft, egal wo, kommt es sehr auf den Eintrittsstatus an, ob sich jemand noch fangen kann. Nelson Mandela bildet hier die große Ausnahme. Die meisten Langzeitgefangenen (Ü 25), leben nach ihrer Haftentlassung nicht mehr lange, oder begehen innerhalb von fünf Jahren einen strafrechtlich relevanten Rückfall.
Für Kinder, die heutzutage geboren werden, wird JS eine unbedeutende Fußnote in juristischen Geschichtsbüchern bleiben. Das ist gut so!

Wie stellt sich wohl der berufslose JS ein Leben in Freiheit vor?
Die Welt, die er noch gekannt hat, die gibt es nicht mehr. Der kann doch nicht einmal ein IPhone bedienen, weil (angeblich) kein Internetzugang.
Zudem gilt meines Erachtens der Grundsatz:"Was jemand bis zum fünfzigsten Lebensjahr nicht geschafft hat, das kann derjenige nur noch mit großer Unwahrscheinlichkeit schaffen!"
Meiner Meinung nach ist JS absolut "triebgesteuert" gewesen. Dieser Trieb schlummert wohl immer noch in ihm. Seine in den Newslettern aufgezeigte Aggressivität ist hochgestaut, daher kommt JS wohl auch zu solch unrealistischen Forderungen wie ein Wirtschaftsboykott der BRD gegen Virginia, wenn JS nicht an die BRD ausgetauscht (mit Guantanamo-Häftlingen) würde, oder zumindest überstellt, da ja sein Liebesdelikt wohl eher "politisch" gelagert sei!
Ein Schuft ist, wer Schlechtes dabei denkt!


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

26.09.2016 um 20:58
@alle

Youtube: Doku: Ich bin ein Psychopath
Doku: Ich bin ein Psychopath


Sehr interessant, dort geht es um einen Psychopathen, sehr sehr viel passt meiner Meinung nach auf JS


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

26.09.2016 um 22:37
Ich halte JS schon länger für einen Psychopathen. Die Zeichen sind doch recht deutlich.
Umso weniger verstehe ich, warum er immer wieder Menschen findet, die auf ihn reinfallen.

Ok, KS hat er schon länger im Sack, die gehorcht ihm scheinbar auf's Wort, aber was ist beispielsweise mit JV, dem Produzenten, der mit KS den Film gedreht hat? Wie kann der so dermaßen blind sein?


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

26.09.2016 um 22:53
@SheRa77

Danke für den Link. Die Übereinstimmungen mit JS sind tatsächlich frappierend!


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

26.09.2016 um 22:59
@alle

Das Video des vorgestellten Psychopathen brachte mich bereits nach zwei Minuten zum Kotzen. Ich habe n
(leider) nicht die (psychische Kraft mir eine solche (Selbstinszenierung/scheiße) anzusehen. Sorry!


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

26.09.2016 um 23:22
Ich erzähle euch folgende Tatsache: Anfang 2007 veröffentlichte die Karin Steinberger erstmalig einen ganzseitigen Artikel (ungeprüft) in der Süddeutschen Zeitung auf Seite 3. Dabei fiel mir auf, dass sie die Opfernahmen verwechselte. Nancy Haysom war auf einmal die teufelsgekrönte Tochter. Karin Steinberger ging selbst nach schriftlicher, aber auch telefonischer Erinnerung darauf nicht ein. Meine Frage:" Werden wir von JS eigentlich alle - auf Kosten von Elizabeth Haysom - verarscht?


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

27.09.2016 um 14:32
ich bin mir nicht einmal sicher, ob der Filmproduzent tatsächlich 100%ig von JS Unschuld überzeugt ist. Man sehe es mal aus der kommerziellen Sicht. Die Geschichte hat guten Stoff für einen Kinofilm, das lässt sich gut vermarkten und wohl möglich auch gut Gewinn machen. Es gibt ein paar Ungereimtheiten, die man erklären könnte, oder es so aussehen lässt, als sei da komplett etwas falsch gelaufen und der arme JS sitzt nun für ein Verbrechen was er nicht begangen hat. Das hat was. Nur muss es noch lange nicht stimmen, dass es genau so gewesen ist, sondern es könnte so gewesen sein.


melden

Der Fall Jens Söring

27.09.2016 um 22:50
@Venice2009

Schwer zu sagen. Natürlich geht es auch um Kohle und KS schlachtet die Story ganz im Sinne bzw Geiste von JS aus. Aber kann er mit so einer tendenziösen Nummer wirklich punkten? Fern ab von dem Fanclub von JS sind die Leute doch kritischer. Vor allem Leute die sich Dokus reinziehen. Ist halt kein RTL Publikum.

@Ashford1986

Ich hatte mit dieser Dame auch schon Kontakt. Auch ich sprach sie auf ihre etwas seltsame Rollenverteilung (JS der weiße Ritter vs EH die Psychobraut). Da kam dann nicht viel, ausser das sie wohl mal ein Brief von ihr bekommen hätte, der sie davon überzeugt hat, dass was mir ihr nicht stimmt.


melden