Ufologie
Menschen Wissenschaft Politik Mystery Kriminalfälle Spiritualität Verschwörungen Technologie Ufologie Natur Umfragen Unterhaltung
weitere Rubriken
PhilosophieTräumeOrteEsoterikLiteraturAstronomieHelpdeskGruppenGamingFilmeMusikClashVerbesserungenAllmysteryEnglish
Diskussions-Übersichten
BesuchtTeilgenommenAlleNeueGeschlossenLesenswertSchlüsselwörter
Schiebe oft benutzte Tabs in die Navigationsleiste (zurücksetzen).

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

366 Beiträge, Schlüsselwörter: Aliens, Sternenklau

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

05.02.2020 um 23:20
@Wolkenleserin

Der elektrische Impuls vom Gehirn an die Sprechmuskeln verrät nicht nur Forschern mittels Brain-Computer-Interface wie sich Sprache aus dem Zusammenspiel mehrerer Gehirnareale, dem Ich ergibt, um zum Beispiel ALS-Patienten mit Mappings bei gezielten Ansteuerungen von Traumata zu helfen, sondern auch warum du irgendwelche Smileys deplatziert ablieferst, aus Scham zuzugeben, dass dich das Thema überfordert und stattdessen über Sinn oder Unsinn aus Avatar diskutieren willst, aber Facelogs in Zeiten von Apple FaceID für dich ein Fremdwort sind.


melden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

05.02.2020 um 23:55
@Flagstaff

Deplatziert ablieferst? Du redest so irres Zeug, dass es Wahnsinn ist! Und mich überfordert das Thema nicht, sondern ich bin eine sehr interessierte Fragestellerin! Aber: Wir sind hier vollkommen Off-Topic! Wir sollten mal wieder zurück zum Thema kommen!
Und ich will nicht über Avatar reden, sondern ich habe nur Avatar als Beispiel genommen, für Bewusstseinsloading!


melden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

06.02.2020 um 00:33
@Wolkenleserin

Na dann.
Worauf willst du denn mit der altbackenden Idee von Bernal & Co hinaus?


melden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

06.02.2020 um 00:35
@Flagstaff

Ich will nirgendwohin hinaus, ich bin sogar extrem der Meinung, dass Dysonsphären unmöglich zu bauen sind!


melden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

06.02.2020 um 00:37
Und warum bist du der Meinung?
Hast du dazu irgendwelche Ideen, woran es physikalisch genau scheitern könnte oder triffst du nur Vermutungen, warum es aus deiner Sicht keinen Sinn ergibt?

Nebenbei gefragt, was ist für dich denn eine Dyson-Sphäre?


melden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

07.02.2020 um 00:21
@Flagstaff



https://www.allmystery.de/blogs/wolkenleserin/dysonsphaeren_epic_fail_


melden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

07.02.2020 um 09:07
Toller Blog..

aber ich diskutiere nicht in Blogs.. als müsstest du deine Punkte schon zur Diskussion bringen.


melden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

07.02.2020 um 10:28
@Wolkenleserin

Schade. Wenn du die Argumente nicht selbst vortragen willst und ich über Kreuz mit dir diskutieren soll, dann erlaube ich mir, dir ebenso zu antworten:
Is a Dyson sphere stable?
In a type I Dyson Sphere all the structures orbit independently around the star, and their orbits are normal keplerian elliptic or circular orbits. Since the mass of the shell is negligible compared to the sun, the self-gravity can be ignored (it will merely cause some precession of elliptical orbits). And if two orbits intersect, they can be adjusted by using solar sails, ion engines, magsails or similar low-energy devices.
Another version would be based on statites (this is probably due to Robert L. Forward): each solar collector will also be a solar sail, and hover without orbiting above the sun, held up by light pressure. By adjusting the sail area statites can move in and out, and by adjusting their angle they can move away if needed. Traffic control may be a problem, but can likely be handled in various ways, for example by local flight control centres or automatic systems based on flocking behaviour.

The force on a statite would be F = L/(4 pi c r^2) - GMm/r^2, where L is the total luminosity of the sun (3.9e26 W), M is the mass of the sun, m is the density of the statite, r the distance to the sun and c is the speed of light. To remain in balance, the statite will have to have the density

m=E/(4 pi c G M)
(this assumes a 100% reflective statite). Note that this is independent of distance to the sun, closer to the sun the gravitational pull is greater, but the radiation pressure is stronger. The density depends only on the mass/luminosity of the sun. For a statite in the solar system, the density would be around 0.78 g/m^2
A rigid dyson sphere is not stable, since there is no net attraction between a spherical shell and a point mass inside. If the shell is pushed slightly, for example by a meteor hit, the shell will gradually drift off and eventually hit the star. This is a classic problem in elementary mechanics and is usually solved in introductory textbooks.

Gauss Law
One easy way to derive it is from Gauss Law: the integral of the force across an arbitrary closed surface is proportional to the amount of mass inside it. If the surface is a sphere surrounding the dyson sphere, there is obviously an inward force on the surface of the sphere since there is a mass inside it. But if the sphere is inside the dyson sphere (the sun is ignored in this calculation, as we are only interested in the gravity of the dyson sphere), there is no mass inside it and hence the integral must be zero, which means that there is no gravitational field inside the sphere.
Elementary Proof
It can also be proven using only elementary (brute force) calculus. This treatment is from Kleppner & Kolenkow, An Introduction to Mechanics (p. 101) and deals with the force between a point of mass m at radius r on the x-axis from a spherical shell centred at the origin:
Divide the shell into narrow rings. Let R be the radius of the shell, t its thickness (t << R). The ring at angle theta, which subtends an angle dtheta, has a circumference 2 pi R sin theta, width R dtheta an thickness t, which gives it a volume of

dV=2 pi R^2 t sin theta d theta
and a mass of (M/2) sin theta dtheta where rho is the density of the shell.
Each part of the ring is the same distance r´ from m, and by symmetry the force from the ring is directed along the axis with no transversal component. Since the angle alpha between the force vector and the line of centres is the same for all sections of the ring, the force components along the line of centres add to give

dF=G m rho dV cos alpha / r´^2
for the whole ring. This is then integrated: F = int (G m rho dV/r´2) cos alpha. By expressing cos alpha as a function of polar angle we get:
F = [GMm/2] int_0^pi ( (r - R cos theta) sin theta dtheta)/(r^2 + R^2 - 2 r R cos theta)^2/3
(where int_0^pi is the integral from 0 to pi). Through the substitution u=r-Rcos(theta), du=Rsin theta dtheta we get:
F = [GMm/2R] int_{r-R}^{r+R} (u du) / (R^2 - r^2 +2ru)^(3/2)
which is a standard integral resulting in:
F = (GMm/2R)(1/2r^2)[sqrt(R^2-r^2+2ru)-(r^2-R^2)/sqrt(R^2- r^2+2ru)]_{r-R}^{r+R}
For r<R we get:
F=(GMm/4Rr^2){(R+r)-(R-r)-(r^2-R^2)(1/(R+r)-1/(R-r))} = 0
How strong does a rigid Dyson shell need to be?
Very strong. According to Frank Palmer:
Any sphere about a gravitating body can be analysed into two hemispheres joined at a seam. The contribution of a small section To the force on the seam is
g(ravity)*d(ensity)*t(hickness)*A(rea)*cos(angle).
The integral of A*cos(angle) is (pi)*R^2.
So the total force is g*d*t*(pi)*R^2. Which is independent of distance, neatly enough.

The area resisting the force is 2*(pi)*R*t.

Thus, the pressure is g*d*R/2; this can be translated into a cylindrical tower of a given height on Earth. If that tower built of that material can stand, then the compression strain is not too great.

At 1 AU, that comes to 2*([pi]*AU/YR)^2, or -- by my calculations -- in the neighborhood of 80 to 90 THOUSAND kilometers high.

The tendncy to buckle, moreover, is another problem.

What about gravity on a rigid Dyson shell?
A nonrotating dyson shell would have just two sources of gravity: the shell itself and the star. As mentioned above, on the inside only the gravity of the star would be felt and everything would fall down into it, while on the outside there would be weak gravity (for a 1 AU sphere centred around the sun, the gravity would be 6e-3 m/s^2).
The only ways to make a rigid Dyson shell habitable on the inside would be either to provide it with some sort of antigravity (which is unlikely) or to rotate it, which would make only the equatorial band habitable unless the interior was terraced. A rotating dyson sphere would be under immense strains; see the section about the ringworld for a simple calculation. Niven pointed out that if you want to spin a Dyson sphere, it is better to build it like a film canister for reasons of structural strength, and then you have a Ringworld.

It has been suggested that one could live on the outside of the sphere, especially if the interior star is rather cool; it appears that a terrestrial environment is possible around M stars just at the end of the main sequence. Erik Max Francis gives the following derivation of this kind of sphere:

First, know the luminosity-mass relation for main sequence stars:

L = k M^nu,
where k is a constant of proportionality and nu is between 3.5 and 4.0. (k depends on the choice of nu, obviously.) You can find the constant k, given nu, based on the fact that the Sun has a luminosity of 3.83 x 10^26 W and a mass of 1.99 x 10^30 kg.
Second, know the gravitational acceleration:

g = G M/R^2.
Third, the blackbody power law (we're approximating the star as a blackbody, which isn't too bad of an approximation):
L = e sigma A T^4.
Knowing these factors, you can combine them to get an equation which relates the mass of the star to the desired temperature and gravity of the sphere:
k M^(nu - 1) = 4 pi e sigma G T^4/g.
Substituting ideal conditions (g = 9.81 m/s^2, T = 300 K), you find that M must be between 0.054 and 0.079 masses solar (the variance is dependent on the variance in the exponent in the mass-luminosity relation). The end of the main sequence is at about 0.08 masses solar, for comparison.
This would produce spheres with a radius of 0.0057-0.0069 AU (852,720 - 1,032,240 km).

It might also be possible to have a biosphere between two dyson spheres (this is used in Baxter's The Time Ships).

Would the solar wind be a problem?
If an earthlike ecology was built inside a large rigid dyson shell, there would be an influx of ions (mostly hydrogen) from the solar wind. The solar wind has a density of around 5 ions/cm^3, moving at around 500 km/s; that would lead to an influx of 2.5e12 ions/m^2/s. This might appear large, but is actually a tiny amount, just 4e-12 mol (one gram of hydrogen is approximately one mol). Since the hydrogen could not naturally escape from the atmosphere it would gradually become more and more hydrogen rich, but it would take trillions of years before the effects became significant. The net force from the solar wind and the light pressure (which is larger than the solar wind pressure) is also minor compared to the attraction of the sun and the internal strains of a rotating dyson shell. In a type I dyson sphere the light pressure could be used to keep statites hanging in space.
It should be noted that there would be no auroras in a dyson shell, since there is no magnetic field. This also would also mean that more radiation would reach the ground from the sun since it cannot naturally be deflected (although one could imagine megaengineering systems to provide an artificial magnetic field).

Can a Dyson sphere be built using realistic technology?
A type I Dyson sphere can be built gradually, without any supertechnology or supermaterials, just the long-term deployment of more solar collectors and habitats. This work could start today (and one might argue that our satellites are the first step). Using self-replicating machinery the asteroid belt and minor moons could be converted into habitats in a few years, while disassembly of larger planets would take 10-1000 times longer (depending on how much energy and violence was used).
A rigid dyson shell would require superstrong materials, and its construction is complicated since half a shell is unstable. One could conceive of some dramatic capping process, where a number of previously freely orbiting structural components at the same time moved inwards to lock together into a shell (for example twenty spherical triangles). This would require tremendous precision, but since supertechnology is already assumed for building a rigid shell, it seems almost trivial. As somebody put it, if you can build a dyson shell you don't need it.

Is there enough matter in the solar system to build a Dyson shell?
Dyson originally calculated that there is enough matter in the solar system to create a shell at least three meters thick, but this might be an overestimate since most matter in the solar system is hydrogen and helium, which isn't usable as building materials (as far as we know today). They could presumably be fusioned into heavier elements, but if you can fusion elements on that scale, why bother with a dyson sphere?
If one assumes that all elements heavier than helium are usable (a slight exaggeration), then the inner planets are completely usable, as is the asteroid belt.

Mass (1e24 kg)

Mercury: 0.33022
Venus: 4.8690
Earth: 5.8742
Moon: 0.0735
Mars: 0.64191
Asteroids: ~0.002

Sum: 11.78733e24 kg
It is a bit more uncertain how much of the outer planets is usable. Jupiter and Saturn mainly consist of hydrogen and helium, with around 0.1% of other material. Jupiter is assumed to have a rock core massing around 10-15 times the Earth, and Saturn probably contains a smaller core massing around 3 times the Earth. Uranus and Neptunus seem to be mainly rock and ice, with around 15% hydrogen, so a rough estimate would be around 50-70% usable mass. Pluto seems to be around 80% usable.

Mass (1e24 kg) Usable Mass (rough estimate)

Jupiter: 1898.8 ~58
Saturn: 568.41 ~17
Uranus: 86.967 ~43
Neptune: 102.85 ~51
Pluto: 0.0129 ~0.01
Kuiper belt objects: ~0.02 ~0.016

Sum: 2657.06 Usable: ~170

(this is based on the assumption that the size distribution of the Kuiper belt mirrors the asteroid belt)
(these tables based on information from Physics and Chemistry of the Solar System by John S. Lewis and The Nine Planets by Bill Arnett)

The inner system contains enough usable material for a dyson sphere. If one assumes a 1 AU radius, there will be around 42 kg/m^2 of the sphere. This is probably far too little to build a massive type II dyson sphere, but probably enough to build a type I dyson sphere where mass is concentrated into habitats and most of the surface is solar sails and receivers, which can presumably be made quite thin.

With the extra material from the outer system, we get around 600 kg/m^2, which is enough for a quite heavy sphere (if it was all iron, it would be around 8 centimeters thick, and if it was all diamond around 20 centimeters).

A Type III shell, a "dyson bubble", would have a very low mass. Since its density is independent of the radius (see the stability section), its mass would scale as r^2. For an 1 AU bubble, the total mass needed would be around 2.17e20 kg, around the mass of Pallas.

Wouldn't a Dyson sphere heat up?
Even if the civilisation living in the Dyson sphere did its best to store available energy, thermodynamics eventually wins and the sphere begins to radiate away energy until equilibrium is reached. Its temperature becomes
T=[E/(4 pi eta sigma r^2)]^(1/4)
where eta is the emissivity (=1 for a blackbody), sigma the constant of Stefan-Bolzman's law (5.67032e-8 Wm^2K^-4)and E the total energy output of the star measured in watts.
In theory, if eta is very low the interior of the sphere could become as hot as desired, but this is unlikely since the material of the sphere would start to melt or evaporate if the temperature moved above 2000-3000K or so. And if the surface of the star became hot enough, the outer parts of the star would expand and a new thermal equilibrium set in with less internal energy production. If the sphere was a perfect energy container the star would eventually expand until its fusion processeses ended; if the temperature was lowered (by energy use) fusion would resume until an equilibrium was reached - a bottled star.

It should be noted that at 1 AU, the energy flux is around 1.4e3 W/m^2, which calculates as around 395 K, or 122 degrees C if the sphere is a blackbody. This is a bit too hot for an earthlike biosphere (Earth is cooled by its rotation, which effectively halves the energy flux, and its spherical shape, that lowers it further), and a dyson shell need some rather impressive cooling to work.

The radius of the smallest passively radiating shell with thermal tolerance T_max is

r_smallest = sqr(E/(4 pi eta sigma T_max^4))
Diamond can stand around 4000K; putting 4000K into the equation, we get 1.48e9 meters, or around 1.4 million kilometers. For 1000K we get a radius of 2.37e10 meters, or around 23 million kilometers. This is roughly 2 and 32 solar radii respectively. With active cooling the shell can be made much smaller.
https://www.aleph.se/Nada/dysonFAQ.html


melden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

07.02.2020 um 11:38
@Flagstaff
@Fedaykin

Dies habe ich bereits getan!
Ziemlich abgeschwurbelter Text den du da gepostet hast! Was ich nicht verstehe ist: Wie soll denn die Energie einer Dyson-Sphäre von der Dysonsphäre zur Erde gelangen?
Und angenommen, es gibt einen Planeten auf dem Leben existiert, in der Nähe dieser angepeilter Sonne, würde eine Dysonsphäre ja das Sonnenlicht dieser Sonne unterdrücken, was sämtliches Leben auf diesem Planeten auslöschen würde?!
Und: Eine Sonne besitzt doch Gravitationskraft, würde dann eine Dysonsphäre nicht in die Sonne hinein gezogen werden und verbrennen?
Und angenommen, die Dinger würden mit Weltraumliften da hinauf transportiert, von wievielen Weltraumliften mit wie vielen Zwischenstationen sprechen wir hier, wenn die kleinsten Sonnen 8,5 mal Erddurchmesser haben?
Und über welche Distanzen müssten Weltraumlifte aus gehen, von orbitalen Weltraumstationen bis zu weit entfernten Sonnen?

Ich verlasse mich hier übrigens nur auf einfachste Logik!


1x zitiertmelden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

07.02.2020 um 12:37
Zitat von WolkenleserinWolkenleserin schrieb:Ich verlasse mich hier übrigens nur auf einfachste Logik!
Und genau da liegt meiner Meinung nach das Problem.

Du kannst die theoretische Nicht-Machbarkeit eines solchen Konstrukts nicht mit "einfachster" Logik begründen. Mit einfachster Logik und etwas Erfahrung bekommst du eine Wurst über dem Feuer gegrillt aber kein Objekt in das Sonnensystem befördert. Oder anders, know the science but dont know the math, bringt dir effektiv nichts, um eine These zu widerlegen. Wenn Physik mit Zahlen, kurz Mathe für dich Schwurbelei ist, und nebenbei wird in dem Beitrag den ich zitiert habe auf Probleme bezüglich der Temperatur eingegangen, dann drehen wir uns im Kreis.

Vielleicht gibt es hier jemanden der dir mit einfachster Logik erklärt wie die Energie zur Erde geführt werden kann aber die Widerworte im Sinne von geht gar nicht, weil Mathematik Schwurbelei ist, nee du das diskutier mal mit dir selbst aus.


melden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

07.02.2020 um 14:32
ich wuerde einfach das "baugeruest" stehen lassen, also diese weltraumlifte.
schlaue aliens verwenden leitendes material dafuer, damit koennen sie dann direkt ins loakle stromnetz.


melden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

07.02.2020 um 15:06
@neoschamane

Das Problem ist die massive Energiezufuhr der Sonne regulieren zu können. Eine Art Verlängerungskabel, welches permanent Energie auf die Erdoberfläche trägt, würde diese defacto ausradieren, weil die Wärme nicht eins zu eins umgesetzt oder abtransportiert werden kann. Wärmestau. Der Witz an der Sache ist, dass Dyson selbst darauf hingewiesen hat, dass eine Zivilisation die derartige Versuche unternähme nicht unbedingt durch Verdunkelung auffiele, sondern vielmehr durch eine künstliche Infrarotsignatur (Exhaust signatures), um die überschüssige Energie loszuwerden.

Stand jetzt gäbe es wenig (Laser, Maser) bis keine Methoden, um Argumente für die irdische Akkumulation zu finden aber dutzende Argumente dagegen z. B. warum man obschon der technischen (organisatorischen) Möglichkeiten nicht gleich auf mehrschichtigen Ringwelten lebt, statt auf der Erde. Einfacher wäre es allerdings effizienter als mit 0,7% Wasserstoff zu fusionieren, um energetisch nicht mehr auf die Sonne angewiesen zu sein. Deshalb die Anekdote ,,wer eine Dyson-Sphäre bauen kann, braucht keine"


melden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

07.02.2020 um 21:35
@Flagstaff

Mit einfacher Logik lässt sich sehr vieles wiederlegen, was einfach nur einem theoretischen Gedankenkonstrukt entspricht!

Weil diese eben: "nicht logisch" ist!

Beantworte mir doch folgende Frage: Wie kommt die Energie von einer Dysonsphäre zur Erde?


1x zitiertmelden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

07.02.2020 um 22:40
Zitat von WolkenleserinWolkenleserin schrieb:Weil diese eben: "nicht logisch" ist!
Achso...
Zitat von WolkenleserinWolkenleserin schrieb:Wie kommt die Energie von einer Dysonsphäre zur Erde?
Mit dem Ruderboot.
Du kannst die Sonnensegel auch auf die Erde ausrichten und dir ein Ei backen.
Oder mittels Lasern oder Masern und Relaisstationen aber bevor ich dir erklärt habe wie man mit Transistoren das Potential von Spannungen bindet habe ich herausgefunden warum du dich nicht selbstständig beliest.


2x zitiertmelden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

07.02.2020 um 23:09
Zitat von FlagstaffFlagstaff schrieb:Wolkenleserin schrieb:
Wie kommt die Energie von einer Dysonsphäre zur Erde?

Mit dem Ruderboot.
Oder man fragt sich, wie die Energie denn überhaupt erst mal zur Dyson-Sphäre gelangt ist. Warum sollte die Energie denn schon an der Dysonsphäre "in Flaschen gefüllt" werden und nicht erst auf der Erde (oder im erdnahen Orbit)!


melden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

08.02.2020 um 00:00
@perttivalkonen

Ja. Selbst die Chinesen planen mittlererile ein Gigawatt-Array.
Ähnliche Ideen dazu liegen schon seit 10 Jahren oder weniger bei der Caltech und Northrop in der Schublade, nur gibt es derzeit in den USA wenig Interesse in derartige Technologie zu investieren, zumal wie du sicher weißt auch keine passenden (eher eigenen) Trägerraketen vorhanden sind um den Solarpark mittelfristig in den Orbit zu schieben - ohne Musk. 1000 Tonnen stehen dort wohl im Raum.

Aber um auf den Anfang zurück zu kommen. Klar. Warum riesige Umlaufbahnen, wenn die Sonne auch vor der Haustür scheint. Und für den meiner Meinung nach undenkbaren Fall, dass jemals so viel Energie benötigt würde, um die Sonne 360 ° zu nutzen, hat man vermutlich auch eine Lösung gefunden, wie Strom nahezu verlustfrei mittels Mikrowelle übertragen wird. Wer so viel Energie benötigt bzw. sich als Zivilisation sukzessiv in diese Größenordnungen entwickelt haben muss, der wird bis dahin ganz andere Probleme, hinsichtlich Speicherkapazitäten und Trafos gelöst haben. Sonst wäre er, so sehe ich es nie an den Bedarf herangewachsen.

Was denkst du denn dazu?
Warum sollte man überhaupt derartiges unternehmen, nur weil es theoretisch irgendwie machbar erscheint.

Sollte man unter dem Aufwand, ganze Planeten dafür zu nutzen nicht eher neu siedeln?
Die ganze Idee dahinter klingt vermutlich auch der damaligen Zeit geschuldet wie eine Beschreibung für Außerirdische der 90er Jahre. Nur, dass der Mensch ein Sonnensystem abholzt, nicht ET.


1x zitiertmelden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

08.02.2020 um 00:17
@Flagstaff
Ähm, mir gings jetzt nicht um Sinn oder Unsinn von Dysonsphären oder tolle künftige technologische Möglichkeiten, Strom in Flaschen zu füllen. Sondern um die reichlich dämliche Frage, wie man denn bloß die Energie vonner Dysonsphäre zur Erde bekäme. Dabei brauchts dafür keine Zukunftstechnologie, das würden wir heut schon hinbekommen. Und man muß dann auch keine Energie-Depots einrichten, sondern holt sich ständig genau so viel Energie, wie man grade braucht. OK, mit ein paar Minuten zeitlicher Verzögerung... Einfach die Sonnenstrahlung zur Erde spiegeln, und je nach Bedarf die Spiegel der Dyson-Sphäre zur Erde richten oder eben nicht.
Zitat von FlagstaffFlagstaff schrieb:Warum sollte man überhaupt derartiges unternehmen, nur weil es theoretisch irgendwie machbar erscheint.

Sollte man unter dem Aufwand, ganze Planeten dafür zu nutzen nicht eher neu siedeln?
Die ganze Idee dahinter klingt vermutlich auch der damaligen Zeit geschuldet wie eine Beschreibung für Außerirdische der 90er Jahre.
Diese Fragen sind irrelevant für die Frage der technischen Realisierbarkeit des Energietransfers. Wie gesagt, es ging mir nur um die Frage
Wie kommt die Energie von einer Dysonsphäre zur Erde?



1x zitiertmelden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

08.02.2020 um 00:50
Zitat von perttivalkonenperttivalkonen schrieb:Einfach die Sonnenstrahlung zur Erde spiegeln, und je nach Bedarf die Spiegel der Dyson-Sphäre zur Erde richten oder eben nicht.
Vielleicht versteh ich dich nur wieder falsch.

Wie willst du das Licht einer flächigen Quelle sauber bündeln ohne dafür einen Laser zu nutzen?
Parabolspiegel und Linsen fallen meiner Kenntnis nach raus. Damit bekommst du keinen sauberen Brennpunkt, den man sicherheitstechnisch schon bräuchte, um die Erde nicht mit Näherungswerten für ein bewegtes System zu grillen. Wieso keine katadioptrische Sammellinse vorspannen, quasi als Umspannwerk, und die letzte Meile mit fester Phasenbeziehung auf ein Empfangsarray überbrücken? Die Überschüsse könnte man doch schon dort auslenken, indem der Laser durch Phasenrauschen die Zufuhr kappt.


2x zitiertmelden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

08.02.2020 um 06:08
Zitat von FlagstaffFlagstaff schrieb:grillen ...
zum glueck ist das "grillgut" an einer art drehspiess angebracht, und die schlauen dysonsphaeren bauenden aliens haben den aequator ihres grillguts kilometerbreit mit energieabsorbern zugepflastert.


melden

Sind Außerirdische für das Verschwinden von Sternen verantwortlich?

08.02.2020 um 10:59
Zitat von FlagstaffFlagstaff schrieb:Vielleicht versteh ich dich nur wieder falsch.
In der Tat.

Na selbstverständlich sollte die Spiegeltechnik auf dem Niveau sein, daß das reflektierte Licht gezielt bei meiner Photovoltaik-Anlage ankommt und nicht fein verteilt auf dem ganzen Planeten. Laser is freilich nur eine Lösung.

Aber auch das geht schlicht an meiner Beantwortung jener Frage vorbei, wie man denn nu die Energie auffe Erde kriegt. Wenn Du das weiter diskutieren willst, such Dir nen passenden Thread und gewillte Mitdiskutanten.


1x zitiertmelden