weitere Rubriken
PhilosophieTräumeOrteEsoterikLiteraturHelpdeskAstronomieGruppenSpieleGamingFilmeMusikClashVerbesserungenAllmysteryWillkommenEnglishGelöscht
Diskussions-Übersichten
BesuchtTeilgenommenAlleNeueGeschlossenLesenswertSchlüsselwörter
Schiebe oft benutzte Tabs in die Navigationsleiste (zurücksetzen).

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

79.633 Beiträge, Schlüsselwörter: Krieg, EU, Merkel, Obama, Ukraine, Krise, Putin, Krim, Maidan, Jazenjuk, Bandera + 11 weitere

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:15
@kurvenkrieger
Demnach hätte die russische Regierung ihre Legitimität verloren, da sie militärisch auf die Aufstände im Kaukasus reagiert hat...was soll ich dazu weiter ausführen?


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:16
@sarasvati23

Offenbar verstehst du nicht, dass der Präsident das Sondergesetz zur Rückkehr zur Verfassung von 2004, innerhalb von 48 Stunden hätte unterzeichnen müssen.


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:16
Taln.Reich schrieb:ähm, nein, welcher Teil der Staatsorgane mit einer gewaltsamen Aktion die Macht übernommen?
Zählt die Opposition nicht als Staatsorgan? Sie hat den Maidan angeführt, der Janukowitsch gewaltsam gestürzt hat und hinterher kam die Opposition mit der Übergangsregierung an die Macht.


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:16
@Befen
The Yatsenyuk government followed the anti-government Euromaidan protests that began in 2013, and culminated in the 21 February 2014 dismissal of President Viktor Yanukovych in the 2014 Ukrainian revolution.[4] The government was first presented at Kiev's main Euromaidan protest camp at Maidan Nezalezhnosti on 26 February 2014. The government was voted on by Verkhovna Rada on 27 February 2014.
Das
was first presented
ist wörtlich zu nehmen, der Maidan hatte verkündet wer die Regierung stellen soll.


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:17
The New Ukraine Is Run by Rogues, Sexpots, Warlords, Lunatics and Oligarchs
There were times in Ukraine’s recent history when even the country’s military brass were kneeling before the U.S. Literally. In June 2013, then-U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine John Tefft received the saber of the Ukrainian Cossack in the city of Kherson from a kneeling Ukrainian high-rank military official. Mr. Tefft nowadays is serving the country as an Ambassador to Russia where no such honors are even imaginable.

But that was then—a previous regime.

On the surface, today’s Ukraine is much more favorably disposed toward everything Western and everything American because of the exciting wind of transformations that swept through the Ukrainian political landscape last year. Its political culture looks modern, attractive, refined and European. For example, at the end of last year a new law was passed that allowed former citizens of other countries to participate in Ukrainian politics and even the government, in case they denounce their former citizenships. The reason given was the fight with notorious Ukrainian corruption. Apparently, in a country of more than 40 million people, Prime Minister Arseny Yatsenyuk (called “Rabbit” by his citizens) couldn’t find a dozen or so native-born yet not corrupt professionals for his government.

Now three former foreigners—ex-American Natalia Yaresko (Minister for Finance), ex-Lithuanian Aivaras Abromavičius (Minister For Economy and Trade) and ex-Georgian Alexander Kvitashvili (Minister for Public Health)—are firmly established in their new cabinets. They are just the beginning. They gave up their U.S. and European passports with only two benefits in return: a $200-a-month salary and the chance to build a prosperous new Ukraine.

In a strange twist of fate, the Ukrainian ministers during their meetings now have to speak hated Russian—former foreigners do not speak Ukrainian well enough and locals do not speak English at the level necessary for complicated discussions on how to save a Ukraine economy that is disappearing before their eyes.

The problems they are facing are overwhelming. The new minister for economy, Mr. Abromavičius, knows that the country is in fact bankrupt. “To expect that we are going to produce real as opposed to declarative incentive programs is unrealistic,” he declared. In other words, the new Ukrainian budget is nothing but a piece of paper. But without this piece of paper there will be no new money from the European Bank and the IMF.

The first steps he has taken so far are controversial.
estonia lady 5555
On January 5, the new minister for economy appointed former Estonian Jaanika Merilo—a young dark-haired beauty—as his advisor on foreign investments, improvement of business climate in Ukraine, coordination of international programs and so on. Directly after her appointment, the young lady put online not her resume or a program for Ukrainian financial stabilization but a series of candid shots that display her long legs, plump lips and prominent cleavage. In some shots, she places a knife to her lips a la Angelina Jolie and sits on the chair a la Sharon Stone.

Ms. Merilo, too, forfeited her European passport in the hope of a better future for her new Motherland.

By law, double citizenship is not permitted for a Ukrainian governmental official, but, as often happens in Ukraine, for some there is always another way around. The governor of Dnepropetrovsk region, oligarch Igor Kolomoisky, for example, has three citizenships.

As exhilarating winds of change swept through the Ukrainian government, Western newspapers giddily reported the fact that after the last elections for the first time in decades there would be no Communists in the Ukrainian Parliament. But that means all possible organized opposition to the current president and prime minister is gone.

Instead, the new Rada has a big group of parliamentarians of very uncertain political loyalties and even dubious mental state—former warlords and street activists who distinguished themselves during street fights and tire burnings.

These government rookies are sometimes turning to strange ways of self-promotion, now within the walls of the Parliament.

One new face in the Rada—leader of the Right Sector ultra-nationalist party and former warlord Dmytro Yarosh—admitted in a January interview with Ukrainian TV that he caresses a real hand grenade in his pocket while inside the Rada. Because he is MP, the security personnel has no right to check his pockets. They just ask if he has anything dangerous on his person and he says no. The reason to have a hand grenade on his body is that there are too many enemies of Ukraine within the MP crowding him during the voting process. He is not afraid, of course. But when the time comes, he will use this grenade and with a bit of luck he will take a lot of them with him if he dies.kmo 140796 00009 1 t218 181102
Ukrainian MPs Yuri Beryoza and Andrei Levus, also former warlords and members of radical parties, became notorious last December after publicly applauding the terrorist attack in the Russian city of Grozny—an attack in which 14 policemen were killed. “On our eastern borders our brothers are coming out from under Russia’s power. It’s normal. These are the allies of Ukraine,” said Mr. Beryoza. This is the same fellow who had earlier promised that the Ukrainian army would soon take Moscow. Andrei Levus proposed Russia withdraw all of her “punishers” from the “People’s Republic of Ichkeria” (i.e. Chechnya) immediately.

Another former warlord, former member of social-national party and today’s Ukrainian MP Igor Mosiychuk said to the journalists that Ukraine, “being in the state of war, must stimulate the opening of the second front in the Caucuses, in Middle Asia” against Russia. In the scandalous video, which has been viewed 2.5 million times, he unloaded an assault rifle into the portrait of the Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov ranting, “Ramzan, you have sent your dogs, traitors into our land. We have been killing them here and we will come after you. We will come after you to Grozny. We will help our brothers to free Ichkeria from such dogs like you. Glory to Ukraine! Glory to the free Ichkeria!”

Despite this bravado, the personal security for all three MPs had to be increased—at high cost to the cash-starved country—after the Chechen leader promised to bring them to justice in Russia for incitement of terrorism.
While it may be tempting to dismiss these words as the ravings of former warlords who have been traumatized by war, worrisome shifts of the political mindset have been appearing in the mainstream of the Ukrainian political establishment.

Anton Geraschenko is the poster boy of the next generation of Ukrainian politicians. He holds an important position as the advisor to the minister for internal affairs, executing the role of the Ministry’s spokesman. This 36-year-old, well-educated member of the Parliament is a familiar face on TV, and a darling of the nation’s political talk shows. He is well-spoken and gives elaborate interviews on every political subject to all major Ukrainian newspapers.

Last Friday, while on his trip to the U.S., Mr. Gerashchenko published two controversial posts on his Facebook page, which could be considered very revealing from the perspective of the changing mood in the Ukrainian political class toward the United States.

In the first, Mr. Gerashchenko praised a George Soros article in which the 84-year-old financier is “flying high” like an eagle “over the pettiness of Obama and other political dwarfs.” Mr. Gerashchenko blamed Mr. Obama and other “political dwarfs” for not realizing that “Putin’s actions towards Ukraine are the tectonic shifts in the world history, much bigger in scale than those that were the results of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 in New York and Washington.” According to Mr. Gerashchenko, George Soros lost all hope that “Barack Obama will give a chance to the people of the United States to give large-scale economical assistance to the people of Ukraine, not the miserable hand-outs that have been ten times less than the help that was given to Iraq or Afghanistan.” Mr. Gerashchenko vented his frustration at Mr. Obama for not giving Ukraine money on the scale of the Marshall Plan or the aid packages that were given to rebuild Japan after WWII or South Korea after the Korean War.
tevd7gbt.jpeg
According to his post, Mr. Gerashchenko believes that the United States has the obligation to give to the Ukraine enough money so the people of “occupied Crimea and Donbass in a maximum of three or five years would dig tunnels and destroy walls and barbed-wire fences, bursting into the territory of prosperous Free Ukraine … looking for jobs, social assistance, high quality of living – as a counterweight to the Mordor which the Russian Federation will definitely have become” (‘total catastrophe’) under the leadership of “Putler.” (“Putler” being ‘Putin’ and ‘Hitler’ combined into one word—a popular new term among Ukraine’s new political class.)

The Facebook post by the young Ukrainian politician created an uproar in both Ukraine and Russia—but Western media preferred to look the other way.

Inspired by his sudden notoriety, Mr. Gerashchenko posted one more rant on the same subject later on the same day in which he elaborated his ideas even farther.

“Yes, Obama is a political dwarf because it looks like he does not grasp the full scale the consequences of Putin’s capture of Crimea. Because last spring and in the beginning of last summer Obama took the ‘ostrich’s position’ and preferred not to see the Putin’s aggression on the continental part of the Ukraine. In the U.S.A., Barack Obama for his indecisive actions and lost positions in foreign politics is called ‘lame duck’ which is analogous to our expression ‘shot-down pilot’. And this name is well deserved. Barack Obama will never be put in the same row with such great U.S. Presidents as Franklin Roosevelt or Ronald Reagan. And even with Bill Clinton …”

In his second post Mr. Gerashchenko went on to say that he was expressing not only his own feelings but the attitude of a significant part of the Ukrainian population, “which considers Obama’s actions unworthy of the leader of the most powerful nation in the world, the one that made Ukraine give up its nuclear status … Instead of decisive actions, from March on we have seen nothing but declarations that the White House is ‘very concerned,’ expresses its concerns’ and also ‘deeply worried’ by the situation in our country.”

By Mr. Gerashchenko’s light, President Putin’s entire operation in Crimea and Donbass was possible only because Mr. Putin knew that Mr. Obama would never risk any strong moves to stop him. According to this star of Ukrainian politics, America gave “only” $1 billion to Ukraine but Mr. Gerashchenko and the like view this as a pittance. Instead, they want a big slice of the hundreds of billions that the U.S. has spent on war from 2001-2014 in Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan.

These revealing and troubling posts were deleted within hours on the same day they appeared. Deleted or not, Mr. Gerashchenko, as well as some significant number of Ukrainian politicians, rant at Mr. Obama for not doing what George Soros wants him to do—immediately spend $50 billion of U.S. and E.U. taxpayers’ money on building an immediate paradise in Ukraine. George Soros’ motives could be pragmatic, of course. Some evil tongues have been saying that the financier’s arguments for the bailout of a falling Ukrainian economy by the U.S. and European taxpayers have roots not in his love for freedom around the world. They say that he has a lot of the Ukrainian government’s bonds in his portfolio and in the case of Ukraine’s national default he will lose billions.Ironically, the biggest winner of a significant and prompt infusion of Western money into Ukraine would be the hated “Putler.” Just last week, Russia, strapped for cash itself as the ruble plummets, started to spread rumors that it is considering demanding early repayment of its $3 billion 2014 loan to Ukraine because the conditions of the loan demand such a step in the event that the national debt of Ukraine exceeds 60 percent of its GDP. By now the national debt of Ukraine is around 70 percent of its GDP and the prognosis is that by the end of this year it will be around 90 percent of its GDP. If any significant amount of money is given to Ukraine, Russia will immediately start sucking out a big part of it as Ukrainian gas and other energy bills will finally be paid on time … to Russia.

Mr. Gerashchenko’s scandalous FB posts are gone, but the questions raised by them still remain. Will the Ukrainian political class turn away from the U.S. and the West if the generosity of the U.S. taxpayers does not match the nebulous expectations of the reformers in the Ukrainian government? Are the Ukrainians ready to rely mostly on themselves on the long and painful journey of building their own independent nation? Amid all the reform talk and the importing of attractive foreign “advisors,” one cannot but wonder if it’s nothing more than camouflage for the same old Ukrainian game—to convince the world to give, as Mr. Gerashchenko’s first Facebook post put it, just one more “large-scale economical assistance.”

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story stated that oligarch Igor Kolomoisky is governor of Zaporozhe region. He is actually governor of Dnepropetrovsk region. The Observer regrets the error.
http://observer.com/2015/01/the-new-ukraine-is-run-by-rogues-sexpots-warlords-lunatics-and-oligarchs/


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:17
dunkelbunt schrieb:Auch nicht unbedingt, es geht nur in der Hauptsache um eine überraschende Machtübernahme von Teilen der Staatsorgane
und welcher Teil der Staatsorgane hat in der Ukraine überraschend die Macht übernommen? Es wurde schlichtweg eine Übergangsregierung gebildet, nach dem der Präsident geflohen ist, die, wie es sein sollte, recht schnell mit Neuwahlen folgte.
dunkelbunt schrieb: Wenn man schon auf Wortklaubereien abfährt, dann darf man sich diesen Begriff auch gefallen lassen.
wo fahre ich hier mit Wortklaubereien herum?
dunkelbunt schrieb: Dass da auch oft Gewalt im Spiel sein kann, und sonst was, ist zwar üblich, aber nicht notwendig, um es einen Putsch nennen zu können.
also ich finde schon, das Gewalt, oder zumindest deren Androhung, nötig ist um von Putsch sprechen zu können.


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:19
nicht jeder putsch endet in einem bürgerkrieg ...
wo dann wieder sportsfreunde girkin , motorola und borodai ins spiel kommen .
gubarev war wichtig , der hat die ultras in donetsk dirigiert . jetzt isser ausm spiel , so wie alle bis auf motorola . der feiert wiegesagt noch erfolge in uglekorsk


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:19
Zerco schrieb:Zählt die Opposition nicht als Staatsorgan? Sie hat den Maidan angeführt, der Janukowitsch gewaltsam gestürzt hat und hinterher kam die Opposition mit der Übergangsregierung an die Macht.
der Maidan war aber, weder in militärischer noch paramilitärischer Art der Opposition unterstellt.


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:21
Die Leute haben hier mal gefragt wie die Menschen in den umkämpften Gebieten zu der Ukrainischen Armee stehen. Es gab allerlei Behauptungen, sie würden als "Befreier" usw. angesehen werden. Hier ein Video, von einem ukrainischen Sender:



Ganz interessant, ich höre da niemanden "Heil Ukraine" schreien. Falls Interesse besteht, kann euch ja mal jemand, der russisch sprechen kann den Dialog mit der Frau im roten Pullover übersetzen. Sie sagt nämlich vor wem sie Angst hat.


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:25
@Befen
Die vorläufige Vereinbarung zwischen Regierung und Opposition in der Ukraine sieht eine Rückkehr zur Verfassung von 2004 innerhalb von 48 Stunden nach Unterzeichnung vor.
http://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/DE/Aussenpolitik/Laender/Aktuelle_Artikel/Ukraine/140221_Ukraine-Vereinbarung.html

Nicht innerhalb von 48 Stunden, schreibt zumindestens das auswärtige Amt.

Man hatte Janukowitsch auf dem Maidan gedroht ihn wie Gaddafi zu lynchen. Willst du etwa bestreiten dass der Maidan überwiegend aus rechten Kräften zu dem Zeitpunkt, nicht gewaltbereit war?


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:26
@polos
Je nachdem welcher Ethnie sie sich zugehörig fühlen...man könnte auch die der ukr. Ethnie im Donbas befragen, sofern sie noch da sind, vor wem sie sich fürchten...
Das hat der Krieg auf alle Fälle erreicht, der Graben zwischen den Ethnien wurde so weit vertieft, dass es Jahrzehnte benötigt bis er wieder aufgefüllt werden kann.


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:27
ich bin der festen Überzeugung, dass er trotzdem geputscht worden wäre, hätte er unterzeichnet. Der Putsch war ja das Ziel gewesen und nicht eine Einigung.


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:28
sarasvati23 schrieb:Willst du etwa bestreiten dass der Maidan überwiegend aus rechten Kräften zu dem Zeitpunkt, nicht gewaltbereit war?
ja, ich bestreite, dass der Maidan zu dem Zeitpunkt überwiegend aus rechten Kräften bestand, die gewalttätig waren. Das waren Hunderttausende Demonstranten, glaubst du etwa, das waren alles Nazi-Schläger?


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:28
@sarasvati23

...aus deinem Link
Die vorläufige Vereinbarung zwischen Regierung und Opposition in der Ukraine sieht eine Rückkehr zur Verfassung von 2004 innerhalb von 48 Stunden nach Unterzeichnung vor.
Die hatten nicht unerheblichen Grund gewaltbereit zu sein. Ich gehe trotzdem davon aus, dass zu diesem Zeitpunkt es noch möglich gewesen wäre, auch für Janukowitsch, die Vereinbarung Schritt für Schritt umzusetzen.


melden
Aldaris
ehemaliges Mitglied

Lesezeichen setzen

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:28
Aber das misshandeln von Kriegsgefangenen ist ne andere Nummer.
Ja, aber auch das kommt meistens in jedem Krieg auf beiden Seiten vor. Kennen wir von den Amis, kennen wir von allen anderen. Da verliert man schnell seine moralischen Grundsätze.


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:30
canales schrieb:Je nachdem welcher Ethnie sie sich zugehörig fühlen...man könnte auch die der ukr. Ethnie im Donbas befragen, sofern sie noch da sind, vor wem sie sich fürchten...
Das hat der Krieg auf alle Fälle erreicht, der Graben zwischen den Ethnien wurde so weit vertieft, dass es Jahrzehnte benötigt bis er wieder aufgefüllt werden kann.
Erzähl kein Unsinn. Auf der Seite der ukrainschen Armee kämpfen russische Nazis und auf einigen Naziaufmärschen in Russland gibt es proukrainische Rufe. Die Frau im roten Pulli sagt übrigens, dass sie eine Ukrainerin ist.

Nur mal so. Was zum Nachdenken.


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:30
@jedimindtricks
jedimindtricks schrieb:über die vielen imported rebellen ,von damals bis heute ,kein wort
Und von Dir gabs nie ein Wort zu den importierten Faschos auf Seiten der Nationalgarde.
Hat denn irgendwer jemals bestritten, daß solche Konflikte diese Typen logischweise anziehen wie Scheiße die Fliegen?

@canales
canales schrieb:Demnach hätte die russische Regierung ihre Legitimität verloren, da sie militärisch auf die Aufstände im Kaukasus reagiert hat...was soll ich dazu weiter ausführen?
Rabulistik. Oder gehört Georgien zu Russland wie der Donbass zur Ukraine? Vergleiche, die nie... ach egal...

@polos
polos schrieb:Ganz interessant, ich höre da niemanden "Heil Ukraine" schreien. Falls Interesse besteht, kann euch ja mal jemand, der russisch sprechen kann den Dialog mit der Frau im roten Pullover übersetzen. Sie sagt nämlich vor wem sie Angst hat.
Ich versteh nur leider kein Wort, gibts solche Berichte auch mit Übersetzung?

@Chavez
Observer? Der Wind hat sich scheinbar schon komplett gedreht und nimmt Orkanformat an...
Danke für den Link! Da lese ich glatt mal weiter...


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:32
@Taln.Reich
Nein, aber der Maidan wurde von Rechten angeführt. Die Studenten am Anfang hatte man da längst vertrieben. Am 26. Februar waren eben nicht mehr 100 000nde auf dem Maidan, ich kann aber gerne mal die genaue Zahl heraussuchen.


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:33
@polos
Das ist kein Unsinn...ich habe erst kürzlich mit einer Ukrainerin aus Dnetropetrovsk über die Problematik gesprochen...die Gräben sind noch tiefer als vor dem Krieg.
Und dass da Nazis auf beiden Seiten kämpfen widerspricht dem überhaupt nicht.


melden

Unruhen in der Ukraine - reloaded

05.02.2015 um 21:34
Am 26. Februar waren eben nicht mehr 100 000nde aus dem Maidan, ich kann aber gerne mal die genaue Zahl heraussuchen.
mach das bitte.


melden
112 Mitglieder anwesend
Konto erstellen
Allmystery Newsletter
Alle zwei Wochen
die beliebtesten
Diskussionen per E-Mail.

Themenverwandt